Zel's Vegan NutGourmet

Zel Allen Goes Nuts for Good Health

Posts Tagged ‘nutritional yeast’

Mac -n-Cheese–all Melty and Vegan for Canadian Thanksgiving

Posted by Zel Allen's nutgourmet on October 5, 2012

Nicole Abramowski, blog host of Vegan Nom Noms, says few can resist a melt-in-the mouth taste of vegan mac-n-cheese, especially on special holidays when food favorites are a must. Smith Graduate Nicole loves to sample life in far away places and has lived in England, the Czech Republic, Massachusetts, and now resides in Berlin, Germany, a place she has discovered is a vegan paradise. At Vegan Nom Noms shares recipes, food photography, and all things cool.
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This is probably my most-requested recipes by non-vegans whenever I make it for the holidays. Though there are more vegan mac-n-cheese recipes than you can through a stone at out there on the interwebz, this one has pretty basic ingredients, no need for a blender and is super addicting. I even served it to my very non-vegan family at Thanksgiving, including extended relatives, and several of them commented on how good it was and gobbled it all up. Surprise, it’s vegan! Every year I have a phase where I eat this every week for a few months. I’m pretty sure I will become a mac-n-cheese one day. There’s nothing better, now that the cold is creeping in, to curl up with a bowl of noodley saucy goodness! Nutritional yeast, please marry me.

Without further ado, the recipe! I actually make it two different ways, depending what I want that day. One is baking it like below, but I also sometimes throw the veggies in during the last few minutes the noodles are boiling, strain it, set aside, whisk together the sauce, then throw everything together and warm it up again on the stove. Top with some crunchy onions if you’re feeling fancy. Both the baked version and the saucy version have a special place in my heart. One picture is saucy, but you can find photos of the baked version here on my Vegan Nom Noms blog

VEGAN MAC-N-CHEESE

– 1/2-3/4 lb pasta (I usually just fill the baking tray I’m using halfway with pasta and use that amount)
– 1/2 (110ml) cup soymilk
– 1/4 (60 ml) cup water
– 1/4 (60 ml) cup soy sauce
– 1 cup (240 ml) nutritional yeast
– 3/4 teaspoon paprika
– 1/4 teaspoon cumin
– 2 cloves garlic, minced (or 3/4 teaspoon garlic powder)
– 3/4 teaspoon salt
– 3 tablespoons vegetable or canola oil
– 3 tablespoons margarine
– 1 teaspoon mustard
– 1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
– 2 carrots, shredded (optional)
– 1 medium onion, diced small (optional)
– 1/2 cup frozen peas (optional)
– 3/4 cup frozen chopped green beans (optional)
– enough french fried onions to cover top of mac-n-cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (180 degrees C). Boil water in a medium-sized sauce pan and cook pasta (I like to use shells for this dish). While pasta is cooking, combine everything but the french fried onions in a large bowl and mix together. Try and break up the margarine chunks as much as you can, but they’ll just melt in the oven when it’s cooking so it doesn’t need to be perfect. You can put the veggies in frozen, they’ll cook in the oven too.

Once the pasta’s done, drain and add to the “cheese” sauce. Stir until all the pasta is covered and then pour into a baking dish and top with the french fried onions. Bake uncovered for 25-30 minutes until onions are browned and top of the pasta looks crispy. Eat and enjoy!

Posted in Canadian Thanksgiving, Celebrations, Holiday Recipes, Main Dishes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Magic of Brazil Nuts

Posted by Zel Allen's nutgourmet on January 26, 2009

I’ve been experimenting with plant-based nut recipes for several years now and have used a variety of nuts to create really unique salad dressings. But I had never made a dressing with Brazil nuts—until now. This dressing surprises people. They just don’t expect such awesome flavor in just a couple of tablespoons. And would you believe, there’s not a drop of vegetable oil in this dressing!

Thick and ultra creamy, this dressing is perfect for those who crave salad toppings that feel naughty to the core. But would you believe this thick and indulgent dressing is one heart-healthy salad enhancer. Keep in mind though, that with nut-based foods, a little bit goes a long way, yet still offers plenty of satisfying flavors.

You might be wondering why I’ve ditched the oil that’s usually found in classic salad dressings. Truth is that vegetable oil is just added fat calories and who needs that? Every tablespoon of vegetable oil, no matter what kind—even the much-revered olive oil, is 100% fat that plants 120 calories on your body. You’ll notice that the source of fat in this dressing does not come from minimally nutritious vegetable oils found in most salad dressings.

Instead, healthful mono- and polyunsaturated fats from Brazil nuts give this dressing its richness and natural thickening. Brazil nuts have other charming characteristics, too. They’re revered for their outstanding source of selenium, a mineral known for its powerful antioxidant capabilities.
brazil
Researchers at the University of Illinois conducted a study published in the July 17, 2003 issue of the journal Cancer Research suggesting that the high levels of selenium in Brazil nuts may play a role in preventing breast and other cancers. Selenium aids in inhibiting the production of free radicals that can damage our DNA and deserves special recognition because compromised DNA paves the way for cancer cells to grow.

Brazil nuts are so well endowed with selenium that all it takes is one nut a day to provide the RDA for that mineral. Each nut contains 120 mcg of selenium, while adults require only 55 mcg a day. Pregnant women require slightly more, 60 mcg, of the mineral while lactating mothers need 70 mcg per day. A study published in the February 2008 issue of American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded that eating two Brazil nuts a day could avoid the need to take any selenium supplements.

This important antioxidant mineral also helps to prevent inflammatory, cardiovascular, and neurological diseases. Turn to Brazil nuts for a good source of protein, fiber, and impressive levels of potassium and magnesium. And if that weren’t enough, the nuts contain plenty of iron, zinc, and even the important trace mineral copper that plays an important role in collagen formation needed for bone formation.

Enjoy this Brazil nut treasure on any bowl of greens, and you might be craving salads more often.


ARTICHOKE BRAZIL NUT DRESSING

Yield: 2 1/2 cups

1/2 cup whole Brazil nuts

1 (13.75 ounce) can water-packed artichoke hearts, drained
1/2 cup unsweetened soymilk
1/2 cup water
1/4 cup plus 2 teaspoons lemon juice
2 to 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 tablespoon nutritional yeast
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

1. Grind the Brazil nuts into nut butter in a small electric grinder/chopper or coffee grinder and transfer to a blender.
2. Add the remaining ingredients, and blend until creamy and smooth.
3. Transfer the dressing to a serving bowl and serve with a ladle or use a funnel to pour it into a narrow-neck bottle for easy pouring. Covered and refrigerated, the Artichoke Brazil Nut Dressing will keep for 1 week.

Posted in Antioxidants in Nuts, Brazil nuts, Minerals in Nuts, Nut Nutrition, Nut Recipes, Nuts and Health | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

 
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